Archive for October, 2011

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Mayoral Candidate Questionnaire Responses are coming in…

October 15, 2011

Thanks to everyone who attended the Mayoral Candidate Forum last Tuesday night, and to all of our co-sponsors who helped make it happen! There were about 150-175 people in attendance, which showed the candidates that there are a lot of parents who care how the mayor will address issues important to us. Please help us continue to make a difference by joining us now and/or making a contribution.

There were some interesting moments in the forum! Please share your favorites with us on our Facebook page. We thought the “animal” question was particularly fun and lightened the mood a bit. You can listen to the forum in its entirety here.

SF Parent PAC President, Michelle Parker, was recently interviewed on KQED about issues important to families in the mayoral race. You can listen to the interview by clicking here and then clicking on the “Central SF” tab and pushing the play button.

As promised, the questionnaires have begun coming back in from the candidates. We hope their answers help you decide who will best address the issues important to families in San Francisco. First up-

DAVID CHIU

1. As mayor, will you commit to appoint parents raising kids in San Francisco to City commissions and committees to ensure that the concerns of families, children and students are adequately voiced and addressed? Please answer Yes or No.
Yes.

2. Parent PAC is an organization formed to be the voice of parents in San Francisco politics – a voice that is often sorely underrepresented or missing entirely from conversations about public policies that directly affect children and families. In addition to the above priority (appointing parents to commissions and committees), please tell us specifically how you plan to bring parents’ concerns into the mix of considerations when setting your policy agenda. Please limit your answer to 200 words.
In addition to increasing parental representation on commissions in general, there are a number of other ideas I believe are worth pursuing. I think we should consider an advisory committee made up of to assist with the review and oversight of DCYF. We should also strengthen the relationship and alignment between Family Resource Centers and school sites in communities can be strengthened. And I am supportive of parent-generated report cards for San Francisco schools and services that wrap around families (parks, recreation centers, after-school programs, etc.); the success of student achievement are often measured by test scores, which often do not tell the full story of a child’s education.

3. Will you advocate for the renewal of Prop H (the Public Education Enrichment Fund) and use your position as mayor to renew and expand the Prop H funds? Please answer Yes or No.
Yes.

4. What role do you think the mayor can and should play in the school district, if any? Please limit your answer to 200 words.
I believe that the Mayor can and must use the bully pulpit of the office to fight for students. To start, that means leading the effort in ensuring that Sacramento provides adequate and equitable funding for schools, and amends or eliminates Prop 13 which has led to a dramatic and deplorable divestment from education in California. While I am proud to have supported the passage of the June 2008 parcel tax, Proposition H, and support this year’s Proposition A, we must provide city resources from the General Fund to fill in the funding gaps wherever necessary.
Our Mayor should also strongly encourage and incentivize private sector companies that call San Francisco home to make improvement of our City’s under-performing schools part of their overall missions. For example, I recently asked Twitter, as part of the Central Market/Tenderloin Payroll Tax Exclusion Zone, to provide resources to local teachers and classrooms as well as expose students to 21st century work environments.
Lastly, the Mayor can use city resources to supplement in-school learning by investing in childcare, early education, summer school and after-school programs, and by directing the Department of Children, Youth and Families to work more closely with SFUSD.

5. Do you support the recommendations for Rec & Park funding outlined by the SPUR September 2011 (pgs. 9-10) report:
*  Doubling the Open Space Fund from 2.5 cents to 5 cents per $100 of valuation, which would generate $37.5M. Please answer Yes or No.
Yes. I support the investigation of this potential funding source to ensure that we can dedicate adequate funds to the original purposes of the fund while also providing RPD with more secure funding sources.
*  Forming a citywide assessment district (or multiple small districts) to fund ongoing operations and enhance services, which would generate $15M. Please answer Yes or No.
Yes.
*  Taxing unhealthy behaviors (such as a soda tax) to benefit recreation activities, which would generate approximately $16.8M. Please answer Yes or No.
Yes.

6. Will you lead and support a campaign for a new graduated parcel tax of at least $100M dedicated to schools, parks and libraries that provides support beyond Prop H for schools and also provides for funding to staff and programs for Rec & Park and Libraries? Please answer Yes or No.
No.

7. What do you believe to the be cause(s) of the lack of housing stock appropriate for families and what specifically do you propose to do about it? Please limit your answer to 200 words.
Thanks to planning codes that don’t incent family housing and a proliferation of market rate housing developments with inadequate affordable set asides, the housing stock for families has plummeted over recent decades. As a Supervisor, I’ve worked with the City’s Planning Department and the Mayor’s Office of Housing to pass a comprehensive update to the City’s low-income affordable housing program, bringing it in line with recent state requirements while ensuring that affordable units are built. As Mayor, I want to craft a new housing program, modeled after the Inclusionary Affordable Housing Program, under which new development projects will be required to have a percentage of units be affordable and suitable for our families and workforce.

8. Do you support free MUNI for all youth (under 18)? Please answer Yes or No.
Yes. I will continue to support initiatives that support young transit users, such as free MUNI passes for youth under 18, particularly with funding cuts for school buses.

JEFF ADACHI

1. As mayor, will you commit to appoint parents raising kids in San Francisco to City commissions and committees to ensure that the concerns of families, children and students are adequately voiced and addressed? Please answer Yes or No.
Yes

2. Parent PAC is an organization formed to be the voice of parents in San Francisco politics – a voice that is often sorely underrepresented or missing entirely from conversations about public policies that directly affect children and families. In addition to the above priority (appointing parents to commissions and committees), please tell us specifically how you plan to bring parents’ concerns into the mix of considerations when setting your policy agenda. Please limit your answer to 200 words.
Transparency is the starting point for including the voice of parents in key decision making.  One lesson I have learned as an elected official and head of a city office is that the public also needs to be defended against backroom deals and entrenched special interests. Parents need to know when and where conversations about public policies affecting their children and families are taking place.  I will accomplish this through online media, as well as by sending meeting announcements through schools and community centers.  Any data and reports used to make decisions will be made available to stakeholders before meetings as well.
Accessibility is the next key.  The public dialogue must take place at a time and place where parents can attend. There needs to be increased child care options, which will further help parents to participate.  I will ensure open access to city government and the mayor’s office through liaisons with the community and regular neighborhood meetings.  As Mayor, I will also have no qualms with requiring those who work for you, the people ofSan Francisco, to come to the table and engage in productive dialogue for the purpose of making things happen.

3. Will you advocate for the renewal of Prop H (the Public Education Enrichment Fund) and use your position as mayor to renew and expand the Prop H funds? Please answer Yes or No.
Yes

4. What role do you think the mayor can and should play in the school district, if any? Please limit your answer to 200 words.
The mayor plays a vital role in bringing together the City’s resources to support the district’s ability to provide safe and high quality schools.  As Mayor, I will lead the fight for funding our public schools by heading a coalition of mayors to advocate inSacramentoandWashington,D.C.for increased funding for K-12 schools inSan Franciscoand throughoutCalifornia.
I support increased funding for theSan FranciscoUnifiedSchool Districtfrom the City’s Rainy Day Fund; extension of Proposition A, the parcel tax, to provide funding for capital improvements in theSan FranciscoUnifiedSchool District; and approval of Proposition H to increase access to neighborhood schools and facilitate parental control.
Equally important, we must attract and retain the very best talent in the teaching profession.  As mayor, I will encourage incentive programs to reward successful teachers through performance-based compensation programs; encourage raising teacher salaries; and prioritize affordable housing programs for teachers, making it easier for our teachers to live in and enjoy the benefits of our City. 
As mayor, I will also facilitate partnership opportunities withSan Francisco’s innovative private sector to become involved in preparing the next generation of workers by establishing internship programs.

5. Do you support the recommendations for Rec & Park funding outlined by the SPUR September 2011 (pgs. 9-10) report:
*  
Doubling the Open Space Fund from 2.5 cents to 5 cents per $100 of valuation, which would generate $37.5M. Please answer Yes or No.
Yes
*  Forming a citywide assessment district (or multiple small districts) to fund ongoing operations and enhance services, which would generate $15M. Please answer Yes or No.
Yes
*  Taxing unhealthy behaviors (such as a soda tax) to benefit recreation activities, which would generate approximately $16.8M. Please answer Yes or No.
Yes

6. Will you lead and support a campaign for a new graduated parcel tax of at least $100M dedicated to schools, parks and libraries that provides support beyond Prop H for schools and also provides for funding to staff and programs for Rec & Park and Libraries? Please answer Yes or No.
No

7. What do you believe to be the cause(s) of the lack of housing stock appropriate for families and what specifically do you propose to do about it? Please limit your answer to 200 words.
The major barrier to appropriate housing for families is the astronomical cost.  I would correct the overdevelopment of certain types of housing to make sure there is an adequate supply for the middle class and those with lower incomes.  A strong inclusionary housing policy is important to keepingSan Franciscoa diverse, artistic, entrepreneurial, and multi-income city. When a new housing development is built, 15% of the units have to be sold at below market rate levels. Therefore, I would increase resources for development of new housing in neighborhoods throughout the city as a mechanism to increase the number of available units and provide more low-income and middle-class housing. At the same time, I would slow development of certain types of housing in order to facilitate this outcome.
Through my fiscal reforms and prioritizing housing in our city’s budget process, we will have more money in the general fund which can be used along with redevelopment bonds to provide new or renovated homes for lower income families.
I strongly favor and would enforce all community benefits agreements. I would work with stakeholders to negotiate effective and fair community benefits agreements before new development is approved.

8. Do you support free MUNI for all youth (under 18)? Please answer Yes or No.
Yes

DENNIS HERRERA

1. As mayor, will you commit to appoint parents raising kids in San Francisco to City commissions and committees to ensure that the concerns of families, children and students are adequately voiced and addressed? Please answer Yes or No.
Yes
 
2. Parent PAC is an organization formed to be the voice of parents in San Francisco politics – a voice that is often sorely underrepresented or missing entirely from conversations about public policies that directly affect children and families. In addition to the above priority (appointing parents to commissions and committees), please tell us specifically how you plan to bring parents’ concerns into the mix of considerations when setting your policy agenda. Please limit your answer to 200 words.
My wife Anne and I have chosen to raise our son in San Francisco because we value the expanded cultural opportunities living in an urban environment provides. But we also know it’s not always easy to raise children in San Francisco, and part of my platform as a mayoral candidate is to make the City work better for families- to expand open space, improve schools, and encourage the construction of more affordable housing and mixed-use, transit-friendly neighborhoods. I remain a strong supporter of the Children’s Fund, which sets aside millions of city dollars for efforts aimed at specifically supporting families, children and youth. I also pledge to listen regularly to advocates for San Francisco families like Coleman Advocates, Parents for Public Schools, the San Francisco Organizing Project, and many other important community voices. Across the nation we are seeing a trend of families returning to the urban core, and with improved housing and transit policies, more responsive government and more support for schools, we can see San Francisco keep more of its families. 

3. Will you advocate for the renewal of Prop H (the Public Education Enrichment Fund) and use your position as mayor to renew and expand the Prop H funds? Please answer Yes or No.
Yes
 
4. What role do you think the mayor can and should play in the school district, if any? Please limit your answer to 200 words.
Even though the SFUSD is not a city entity, the Mayor can play a vital role to better support our schools. At Herreraformayor.com, I’ve outlined a detailed plan to bring more funding to our schools, provide more resources to teachers and administrators, and create community schools that better serve our students. My ideas include:
* I’ll push to not just extend Prop H funding (which expires in 2015) but increase the currently allowed from $60 million to $90 million annually. I’ll work to dedicate a portion of the City’s additonal investment toward expanded language immersion programs, to make our kids globally competitive in the coming century.
* I’ll better empower teachers and administrators. I want to eliminate incentives for San Francisco educators to leave for more supportive  or better paying private and suburban schools- especially during those crucial thrid, fourth and fifth years of experience. Attracting and retaining good teachers and principals is something the City must better support.
* I’ll lead San Francisco’s investment in community schools. By encouraging partnerships between neighborhood schools and City programs, we can make our schools neighborhood centers. That will better demonstrate to San Franciscans even without children why investing in public schools matters.

5. Do you support the recommendations for Rec & Park funding outlined by the SPUR September 2011 (pgs. 9-10) report:
*  Doubling the Open Space Fund from 2.5 cents to 5 cents per $100 of valuation, which would generate $37.5M. Please answer Yes or No.
Yes. I agree wholeheartedly wth SPUR’s conclusion that the City must do more to make up for the more than 25 percent of General Fund support that the Recreation and Parks Department has lost in the last five years. I generally support revenue measures, which voters must approve, to accomplish that. But the next Mayor will need to fully and intelligently coordinate our efforts to approach voters with necessary tax reform proposals- including, first and foremost, finally reforming our job-killing business payroll tax. Inundating voters with one-off tax proposals risks having them all rejected, so this will need to be approached prudently and comprehensively.
*  Forming a citywide assessment district (or multiple small districts) to fund ongoing operations and enhance services, which would generate $15M. Please answer Yes or No.
Yes
Taxing unhealthy behaviors (such as a soda tax) to benefit recreation activities, which would generate approximately $16.8M.
Please answer Yes or No. 
Yes

6. Will you lead and support a campaign for a new graduated parcel tax of at least $100M dedicated to schools, parks and libraries that provides support beyond Prop H for schools and also provides for funding to staff and programs for Rec & Park and Libraries? Please answer Yes or No.
Yes

7. What do you believe to the be cause(s) of the lack of housing stock appropriate for families and what specifically do you propose to do about it? Please limit your answer to 200 words.
It’s no secret that housing with open spaces and safe outdoor environments for children is in short supply in this very expensive City. As Mayor of San Francisco, I will be firmly committed to defending and expanding affordable housing that is appropriate for families in San Francisco. I support an affordable housing bond, because the only rational path to make more housing more affordable in San Francisco is to build more housing- and to drive hard bargains with developers to maximize public benefits. City leadership must do more to reach development agreements that expand our affordable housing options, and ensure that people of all income levels can continue to live in San Francisco.
We need a smart growth strategy to add to our current housing stock, while preserving neighborhood characer. I plan to aggressively pursue sustainable growth strategies to reduce our reliance on automobiles and preserve neighborhoods where residents can walk to stores and services, where children can ride bikes and walk to school, and where parents can access public transit to get to work.
 

8. Do you support free MUNI for all youth (under 18)? Please answer Yes or No.
Yes, I think encouraging the use of public transit early in life is important to building civic support for San Francisco’s MUNI system for a lifetime. Free MUNI for youth is a way to do that.
In fact, I am proud to have worked closely with Supervisor David Campos and education advocate Margaret Brodkin to continue a popular and successful program to provide free group MUNI passes to summer programs for kids- which is especially important with cuts to SFUSD summer programming. The Summer Youth Group Pass has provided access to thousands of school children for field trips. Free MUNI supports activities to address summer learning loss, which disproportionately affects low-income kids.

BEVAN DUFTY

1. As mayor, will you commit to appoint parents raising kids in San Francisco to City commissions and committees to ensure that the concerns of families, children and students are adequately voiced and addressed? Please answer Yes or No.
Yes
 
2. Parent PAC is an organization formed to be the voice of parents in San Francisco politics – a voice that is often sorely underrepresented or missing entirely from conversations about public policies that directly affect children and families. In addition to the above priority (appointing parents to commissions and committees), please tell us specifically how you plan to bring parents’ concerns into the mix of considerations when setting your policy agenda. Please limit your answer to 200 words. 
Imagine a school that is the center of the community: Where parents can come to learn about the working family tax credits and anger management, children can get their vaccinations, younger siblings can play under safe supervision. Imagine a school that aligns these services along with teacher professional development, arts and after-school to support the academic success of each child.
As a public school parent, I am committed to working closely with parents to realize this vision. You should be partners with your child’s school to develop a success plan, and hold the District and the City accountable for it’s successful implementation.
As Mayor, I will attend PTA meetings, consult with School Board members, and bring parents into every conversation about ways to improve the City’s investment in youth and families. I will make sure the City’s support for schools is transparent so that every parent can see how City dollars are spent to improve their child’s school, whether through a PEEF arts program, via an excellent school nurse, or with a workforce development program funded through DCYF.
 
3.Will you advocate for the renewal of Prop H (the Public Education Enrichment Fund) and use your position as mayor to renew and expand the Prop H funds? Please answer Yes or No.
Yes
 
4. What role do you think the mayor can and should play in the school district, if any? Please limit your answer to 200 words. 
As Mayor, I will focus on building public private partnerships between our business community, artists, labor unions and our schools.  Why shouldn’t our children benefit from the City’s growing economic strength in biotechnology, health sciences, entertainment and culinary arts? We need these public/private partnerships to get students excited about their educational future.
I will work closely with SFUSD leadership and school stakeholders to help the City improve its investment in schools. The most effective thing the City can do is make sure kids are ready to learn when they show up to the classroom. PEEF has enabled the City to directly support important wraparound services; I will champion its expansion and reauthorization by 2013. I will continue to support authorizing Rainy Day Funds for our schools as necessary. And, as Mayor, I will make sure the City’s support for schools is transparent so that every parent, teacher and student can see how City dollars are spent to improve their school, whether through a PEEF arts program, via an excellent school nurse, or with a workforce development program funded through DCYF.
 
5. Do you support the recommendations for Rec & Park funding outlined by the SPUR September 2011 (pgs. 9-10) report:
*  Doubling the Open Space Fund from 2.5 cents to 5 cents per $100 of valuation, which would generate $37.5M. Please answer Yes or No.
Yes
*  Forming a citywide assessment district (or multiple small districts) to fund ongoing operations and enhance services, which would generate $15M. Please answer Yes or No.
No
*  Taxing unhealthy behaviors (such as a soda tax) to benefit recreation activities, which would generate approximately $16.8M.
Please answer Yes or No. 
Yes
 
6. Will you lead and support a campaign for a new graduated parcel tax of at least $100M dedicated to schools, parks and libraries that provides support beyond Prop H for schools and also provides for funding to staff and programs for Rec & Park and Libraries? Please answer Yes or No.
Yes
 
7. What do you believe to the be cause(s) of the lack of housing stock appropriate for families and what specifically do you propose to do about it? Please limit your answer to 200 words.
Access to high quality affordable housing is key to keeping families in the City. It’s not enough to build thousands of one or two bedroom condos ­— families require space in safe neighborhoods with access to parks, transit and childcare.
As Supervisor, I sponsored legislation to allow in lieu fees to be congregated in order to acquire land in more expensive neighborhoods such as the Castro to be developed for affordable housing.  I pressed for new childcare facilities at the SF Public Utilities Commission headquarters and at the Transbay Terminal project. As Mayor, I will work to integrate high-quality accessible childcare into city-sponsored development projects. I strongly supported the two unsuccessful bond campaigns, and as Mayor will pledge to go to voters in 2012 with an affordable housing bond.
My record speaks to working with developers, labor, affordable housing advocates, and neighborhood leaders to make new projects reflective of the needs of the neighborhoods, and inclusive of services like childcare to make the developments truly livable.
  
8. Do you support free MUNI for all youth (under 18)? Please answer Yes or No.
Yes

LELAND YEE

1.As mayor, will you commit to appoint parents raising kids in San Francisco to City commissions and committees to ensure that the concerns of families, children and students are adequately voiced and addressed? Please answer Yes or No.
Yes

2. Parent PAC is an organization formed to be the voice of parents in San Francisco politics – a voice that is often sorely underrepresented or missing entirely from conversations about public policies that directly affect children and families. In addition to the above priority (appointing parents to commissions and committees), please tell us specifically how you plan to bring parents’ concerns into the mix of considerations when setting your policy agenda. Please limit your answer to 200 words.
I believe that parent input is crucial to helping better educate our children. There are numerous school and parent advocacy groups inSan Francisco, including Parents for Public Schools, ParentPAC, Community Alliance for Special Education, Coleman Advocates, Educate Our State, the PTA, and other parent groups at individual schools or within certain neighborhoods.  As Mayor, I will join with SFUSD to convene an alliance of all these groups to meet regularly, communicate issues, work together to solve problems, and where appropriate, bring other alliances of stakeholders together for joint discussions and collaboration.  Parents, families, service-providers, community members, and educators will be most successful when we all work together.
As mayor, I will focus on implementing a community schools model that will allow more parents and stakeholders to work together and help my administration create solutions and proactively identify problems in advance.

3. Will you advocate for the renewal of Prop H (the Public Education Enrichment Fund) and use your position as mayor to renew and expand the Prop H funds? Please answer Yes or No.
Yes

4. What role do you think the mayor can and should play in the school district, if any? Please limit your answer to 200 words.
The mayor should be the chief cheerleader for education in our city. As mayor, I will work with the Board of Education and the Superintendent of Schools as partners in improving our community. The school district is a separate agency from the City & County government, but a cooperative relationship and regular communication must be developed for the benefit of both agencies.
Of all of the candidates now running for mayor I am the only candidate who served on the San Francisco Board of Education, has had four children matriculate through the SFUSD, and has consistently worked on education policy as a former teacher and school psychologist, schools trustee, supervisor and as a legislator.  I understand on a very practical level that the School Board, the School Superintendent, and the school stakeholders which include teachers, parents and students, are the ones who set and implement policy.  A fully engaged and committed Mayor, working in partnership, can help make a real difference.  That’s why my 22-point plan for education is centered on creating a collaborative community school environment, where all stakeholders come together to provide kids and families with wrap-around services to give them every opportunity to succeed.
(Read the full plan here.)

5. Do you support the recommendations for Rec & Park funding outlined by the SPUR September 2011 (pgs. 9-10) report:
Doubling the Open Space Fund from 2.5 cents to 5 cents per $100 of valuation, which would generate $37.5M. Please answer Yes or No.  
*  Forming a citywide assessment district (or multiple small districts) to fund ongoing operations and enhance services, which would generate $15M. Please answer Yes or No.
*  Taxing unhealthy behaviors (such as a soda tax) to benefit recreation activities, which would generate approximately $16.8M. Please answer Yes or No.
I am interested in looking at all smart ways to increase funding for Rec & Park—specifically, I’ve proposed a combination of a parcel tax measure and park renewal bond in my 22-point plan for a cleaner, greener city (see the full plan here).  While I prefer these modes of funding, I am interested in discussing the creative funding mechanisms proposed in SPUR’s report as well.

This is an excerpt from my environmental plan on parks funding:
Champion a parcel tax measure for dedicated parks funding
With treasured Bay Area State Parks on the brink of closure, strong local park, recreation and natural areas protection programs are more important than ever. Yet in this tough economy,San Francisco’s park funds have been repeatedly cut, programs slashed, and facility maintenance dangerously deferred. Immediate action is essential. A recent SPUR (San Francisco Urban Planning and Research Association) report estimates the Recreation & Parks Department needs an additional $30 million each year to fully fund its operations and its mission. As Mayor, Yee will move to secure dedicated recreation and park funds through passage of a parcel tax to generate the revenue necessary to protect and maintain our treasured parks—and preserve them as vital public assets, not turn them over to private interests.
Support a park renewal bond in 2012
San Franciscodeserves a world class park system—that’s why voters overwhelmingly approved bond measures in 2000 and 2008 to rejuvenate our aging park system.  But even after the current projects are completed,San Francisco’s parks will still face a backlog of $1.7 billion in unfunded projects. That’s why Yee supports the effort to place a park renewal bond on the ballot in 2012 or 2013—and he’ll work with the environmental community to ensure that any projects financed through the bond are not unduly repurposed for privatization or revenue-generation. The combination of a park renewal bond with a parcel tax to fund ongoing maintenance will allow our parks and the neighborhoods they serve to flourish.

6. Will you lead and support a campaign for a new graduated parcel tax of at least $100M dedicated to schools, parks and libraries that provides support beyond Prop H for schools and also provides for funding to staff and programs for Rec & Park and Libraries? Please answer Yes or No.
Yes.

7. What do you believe to be the cause(s) of the lack of housing stock appropriate for families and what specifically do you propose to do about it? Please limit your answer to 200 words.
The decreasing number of rent controlled housing stock and the recent focus on housing for single individuals and couples has made it increasingly difficult for parents to stay inSan Franciscoand raise their families.
San Francisco employs well over 4,000 public school teachers and over 1,000 paraprofessionals—about 30% of them don’t live in the city, many because they simply can’t afford it.  We must provide local educators with every possible option to live and work inSan Francisco– particularly as dwindling funding for public education inCaliforniahas depressed the wages of these professionals.  That’s why I have already pledged to protect rent control and require developers to create affordable housing units, and why as Mayor I will champion an affordable housing bond that includes a carveout specifically for teacher housing.  My administration will support projects like 1950 Mission that build affordable housing on SFUSD property, and look for other opportunities to use surplus SFUSD land to generate funds for teacher housing.  I also support first-time homebuyer programs like Teachers Next Door, but since many teachers can’t afford to buy their own home, we’ll create a pilot program to provide rent subsidies for newly hired teachers or those moving into the city.

8. Do you support free MUNI for all youth (under 18)? Please answer Yes or No.
Eventually, yes.

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